Resource Library

This handout shows the differences between the two types of care given in the IMPACT trial, usual care and collaborative care.

The workflow to support integrated behavioral health care models such as collaborative care is a data-driven process, requiring the care team to actively use a caseload management tool. It is important that these tools are used in conjunction with the practice’s electronic health record (EHR) if they are not already built into it. Patient tracking systems that support measurement-based care vary widely in their sophistication, functionality, cost, and scalability.

Options include:

Using a registry tool that tracks clinical outcomes for populations of patients and supports systematic changes in treatment for patients who are not improving as expected is an essential part of successful Collaborative Care programs.

A succinct collection of prescribing protocols for commonly prescribed psychotropic medications tailored to the outpatient setting.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released a fact sheet detailing the four G codes that can be used to bill for behavioral health integration (BHI) and collaborative care management (CoCM) services.

The Patient Health Questionnaire 2 (PHQ-2) is used by some clinicians and organizations to screen patients for undiagnosed depression.

The AIMS Center published recommendations on September 8, 2015 for fee-for-service payments for psychiatric consultants and care manager functions. These comments were published in response to the CMS invitation for comments on proposed rules to cover collaborative care models for Medicare beneficiaries with common behavioral health conditions.

Patient-Centered Team Care is one of the core principles of collaborative care.

Measurement-based treatment to target is one of the core principles of good behavioral health integration, rooted in the research base of collaborative care.

A list of administrative tasks to be considered when planning an integrated care implementation.

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