Resource Library

This study assesses how fidelity to two key functions of the Collaborative Care model affects patient outcomes. The results suggest that timely follow-up may significantly improve patient depression outcomes.

Trauma can increase the risk of health, social, and emotional problems. Despite the high prevalence of patients with a past history of trauma, few clinics or Collaborative Care teams have a protocol for addressing it. These three tips can help clinicians safely and effectively discuss the trauma history of their patients during their initial assessment.

The objective of this study was to design a bundled case rate that aligned with the variation found in evidence-based depression care in primary care or Collaborative Care for Depression. The investigation's findings supported a monthly case rate design that better matched payment with variation compared with a one-year fixed design. 

A study to determine whether coordinated care management of multiple conditions improves disease control in patients with depression and poorly controlled diabetes, coronary heart disease, or both.

An example of what kind of metrics can be tracked in an integrated care implementation.

A description of the web-based data management system developed to support the IMPACT study, a multicenter trial of a disease management program for late-life depression in primary care.

An article that discusses integrating and adapting evidence-based psychotherapy into primary care settings. The authors synthesize past clinical trials that assess psychotherapy interventions within the constraints and competing demands of the primary care environment, consider barriers inhibiting widespread integration of psychotherapy, and identify future directions.  

A group of primary care providers participating in an integrated mental health program in primary care clinics were surveyed to learn about their experiences. The findings suggest areas for improvement in future implementations. 

This study aimed to test how and if gender moderates treatment outcomes in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention. CALM was a 12-month Collaborative Care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care clinics in California, Washington, and Arkansas. The results showed a relationship between gender and treatment outcomes. 

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