OAT Telehealth

Escalating prescription opioid use and abuse have emerged as major public health problems in Washington. Rural communities in particular have been hit hard due to their limited access to specialists. This project allows mental health specialists in urban areas to support health care providers in rural areas using videoconferencing technology. Patient evaluations and recommendations, caseload supervision, and education are all done remotely via telehealth. This project aims to establish acceptance, effectiveness, and cost-efficacy of telehealth for delivery of mental health and pain medicine care in rural primary care.

Mental Health Integration Program (MHIP)

The Mental Health Integration Program (MHIP), supported and administered by the Community Health Plan of Washington in partnership with Public Health -Seattle and King County, integrates mental health screening and treatment in a collaborative care model (CoCM), including psychiatric case review and consultation. MHIP collaborative care teams in Washington State safety-net primary care settings serve diverse Medicaid and uninsured populations. Since MHIP’s inception in 2007, over 50,000 individuals have received integrated mental health services. In 2007 it began as a state-funded, two-county pilot for high risk uninsured adults in King and Pierce counties, but MHIP expanded statewide in early 2009 to include over 130 primary care clinics.

MHIP uses a patient registry (CMTS) to track and measure patient goals and clinical outcomes, and facilitate treatment adjustment if a patient is not improving as expected. MHIP also utilizes pay-for-performance mechanisms to support model fidelity and prioritize patient outcomes. Training and workforce efforts for this project focus on the whole team and all providers are trained on the fundamentals of CoCM.

Project Management

St. Luke’s Health System Collaborative Care Implementation

The AIMS Center provided training and technical assistance to St. Luke’s Health System as they implemented a Collaborative Care program in April 2017.  This implementation took place over 12 months and included three clinics in spring 2017 and two clinics in fall 2017. Eventually collaborative care will be spread across the entire of network of clinics at St. Luke’s Health System, the only Idaho-based, not-for-profit health system. 

Behavioral Health Integration Program (BHIP)

In an effort to increase access to mental health care in Seattle and King County, the AIMS Center at the University of Washington partnered with UW Medicine to launch the Behavioral Health Integration Program (BHIP). BHIP uses collaborative care to bring mental health treatment into all of the UW Neighborhood Clinics, a system of twelve primary care clinics located throughout greater Seattle, as well as clinics at Harborview Medical Center and the General Internal Medicine clinic at UWMC Roosevelt. Like elsewhere, mental health is a big part of primary care in Seattle and King County; in 2009, 19% of all clinic patients had a mental health diagnosis. Although Collaborative Care has been implemented around the world, the AIMS Center and UW Medicine are very proud to be able to provide it in our own community.

BHIP utilizes a web-based Care Management Tracking System that supports population-based care, provides patient outcome measures, and assists in quality improvement efforts. In October 2012, several goals were established for the BHIP program: to increase patient access by care managers and across all BHIP clinics, to improve patient outcomes on measures of depression and anxiety, to increase provider satisfaction with care management, and to improve provider satisfaction with psychiatric consultation. When measured in August 2013, the BHIP program had exceeded initial targets for each of the seven indicators.

BHIP won a Psychiatric Services Achievement Award from the American Psychiatric Association in 2014, and a Washington Award of Excellence in Healthcare Quality from Qualis Health in 2016.

New York State Collaborative Care Medicaid Program

Developed in 2015, the Collaborative Care Medicaid Program (CCMP) is a state-based program to help clinics fully integrate behavioral health screening and treatment into primary care settings and to provide reimbursement for those services. CCMP grew out of a New York State Department of Health grant-funded demonstration program called the New York State Collaborative Care Initiative, which ran from 2011 to 2014. Having demonstrated robust feasability and acceptability, along with improved clinical outcomes during the grant period, the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) was able to secure legislative funding for the creation of the CCMP. CCMP was the first Medicaid program in the country to provide reimbursement for Collaborative Care services for adult depression. Anxiety diagnoses (including PTSD) were later added to the Medicaid payment, as well as a lower age threshold of 12 years. Another unique feature to the Medicaid payment structure is the Quality Supplemental Payment (QSP) payment, which gives some clinics the opportunity to get an additional payment by achieving quality outcomes.

Now, over 200 clinics participate in CCMP, receiving free training and technical assitance from the AIMS Center and Concert Health, as well as discounted access to the AIMS Centers’ Care Management Tracking System registry and discounted training in Problem Solving Treatment therapy. Part of participation requires the submission of quarterly process and outcomes data to OMH, which is used to further improve the training and technical assitance offered to CCMP clinics.