Implementations

The AIMS Center has worked with over 1,000 organizations and trained more than 6,000 clinicians around the world to implement collaborative care, resulting in improved care for hundreds of thousands of patients.

Sample Projects

The New York State Office of Mental Health selected 19 Delivery System Reform Incentive Program clinics to participate in a year-long learning network where clinics are encouraged to build relationships and learn from one another throughout training from the AIMS Center and Qualis Health.

This project examined depression care and clinical outcomes for perinatal women treated in clinics serving racially diverse low-income populations. 

Poor mental health is a major public health issue that robs millions of people of their chance to lead healthy and productive lives. Depression alone doubles overall healthcare costs, worsens other medical conditions, and results in a staggering loss of productivity at work. In underserved rural areas in the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho) region, a severe shortage of mental health providers compounds these problems.

MHIP helps low income or safety net populations throughout the state of Washington by integrating high quality mental health treatment into primary care settings using Collaborative Care.

COMPASS is a collaborative care model designed to treat patients in primary care experiencing depression as well as diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease.

HRSA and NIMH contracted with the AIMS Center to train and support 11 nurse-led safety-net clinics throughout the US as they implemented Collaborative Care. 

The Collaborative Care Medicaid Program (CCMP) is a program helping clinics in New York to fully integrate behavioral health screening and treatment into primary care settings and to provide reimbursement for those services.

CHAMP (Collaborating to Heal Opioid Addiction and Mental Health in Primary Care) is a NIMH-funded research study testing whether Collaborative Care that addresses both mental health conditions and co-occurring opioid use disorder can improve patient lives. 

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR COHORT 3.

The AIMS Center is partnering with Premera to support up to 30 clinics in rural Washington and Alaska to expand access to evidence-based mental health treatment. Selected clinics will receive up to $245,000 over 15 months to defray participation costs. 

The AIMS Center provided training and technical assistance to St. Luke’s Health System as they implemented a Collaborative Care program in April 2017.  This implementation took place over 12 months and included three clinics in spring 2017 and two clinics in fall 2017. Eventually collaborative care will be spread across the entire of network of clinics at St. Luke’s Health System, the only Idaho-based, not-for-profit health system. 

TEAMcare was a randomized controlled trial designed to test Collaborative Care strategies in managing depression, diabetes, and coronary heart disease in primary care.

BHIP uses Collaborative Care to bring mental health treatment into UW Neighborhood Clinics, a system of primary care clinics located throughout greater Seattle.

DIAMOND was a collaborative effort of 9 health plans, 25 medical groups, and over 80 primary care clinics in Minnesota to implement and study Collaborative Care for depression.

A pilot program attempting to determine whether integrated mental health care can be effective given the unique challenges faced by primary care clinics in Alaska.

The AIMS Center provided training and coaching to five primary care organizations in Texas to implement integrated care for the two mental health conditions most commonly encountered in primary care: depression and anxiety disorders. 

When hurricanes Katrina and Rita devasted New Orleans, the AIMS Center worked on a Red Cross funded initiative to rebuild the primary care system to include Collaborative Care. The project enhanced the availability of evidence-based mental health services to uninsured, disadvantaged, and minority community members offered through REACH NOLA’s Mental Health Infrastructure and Training Project. It also showed the benefits of integrated mental health care after disasters, particularly for depression and post-tr

The AIMS Center helped 30 primary care clinics in Alameda County develop an integrated mental health care initiative targeting depression, anxiety, and PTSD to increase the effectiveness of care.

The New York State Collaborative Care Initiative helped primary care residents learn how to effectively practice team-based care to treat mental health conditions, a skill that has become increasingly important as integrated care becomes more widespread.