In the News

November 19, 2014
Stars and Stripes

Telemedicine-Based Collaborative Care has been shown to clinically improve PTSD symptoms in rural military veterans. The year-long study examined 265 veterans with severe PTSD who either received outpatient psychotherapy or received counseling and psychotherapy through interactive video and phone calls.

November 20, 2014
Puget Sound Business Journal

John Fortney, PhD discusses his most recent study about bringing telemedicine-based Collaborative Care to military veterans living in rural locations. Care teams used telephones, interactive video and shared Electronic Medical Records to collaboratively care for patients. It was found that the patients had better clinical outcomes when using telemedicine for psychotherapy.

November 19, 2014
JAMA Psychiatry

A new study, Telemedicine-based Collaborative Care for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, shows that Collaborative Care can improve PTSD symptoms in military veterans. This study used the Telemedicine Outreach for PTSD (TOP) intervention model to treat US military veterans living in rural areas.

October 10, 2014
Contemporary Clinical Trials

STEPS-UP (Stepped Enhancement of PTSD Services Using Primary Care) is the first randomized effectiveness trial of behavioral and mental health within the US Military Health System.

October 22, 2014
Puget Sound Business Journal

This article discusses the need to integrate mental health care into primary care and highlights the Behavioral Health Integration Program (BHIP) in the UW Medicine Neighborhood Clinics. The use of Collaborative Care in the Neighborhood Clinics has helped thousands of patients and has worked to close the gap between behavioral health care and primary care in Washington State.

October 17, 2014
Psychiatric News

Jürgen Unützer, MD, MPH discusses integrated care and compares two prominent models, the Collaborative Care model and the Behavioral Health Consultant model (BHC). BHC is a rapid access model in which patients are generally seen the same day and lasts about three sessions, whereas Collaborative Care addresses chronic mental health conditions like depression and anxiety that require longer-term treatment to ensure patients don't fall through the cracks or relapse. These two models originated from two different focus areas - Clinical and Research - and each has its own strengths.

October 16, 2014
New York Times

Wayne Katon, MD, discusses his Depression Attention for Women Now (DAWN) study in The New York Times opinion pages. He explains why using Collaborative Care in OB/GYN settings is important for women facing depression before, during and after pregnancy. Dr. Katon also emphasizes the importance of allowing the patient to help choose the treatment option that's best for her.

September 26, 2014
Psychiatric News

An intervention based on the IMPACT model was adapted for teens, using age-appropriate education materials and an “engagement” session with the adolescent and his or her parent.

August 16, 2014
The Seattle Times

In this Seattle Times editorial piece, Jürgen Unützer, MD, MPH, sheds light on some of the issues troubling mental health care today and discusses integration of Collaborative Care as a solution.

September 17, 2014
American Journal of Managed Care

Implementing Collaborative Care in primary care has been shown to improve patient outcomes. This study looks at the DIAMOND initiative and highlights essential elements that make a Collaborative Care implementation effective. Some broad important implementation factors were: leadership, care management, physician engagement and financial issues.

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