Care Partners

Phase 2, Cohort 2

Request for Proposals (RFP)

Based on the success and experience of the first cohort of projects, Archstone Foundation now seeks to support a second cohort of projects that are implementing innovative approaches to treating depression in older adults through the following three types of partnerships:

  • Primary Care Clinic – CBO Partnership: a primary care clinic that has implemented collaborative care and now seeks to partner with a CBO;
  • PEARLS – Primary Care Clinic Partnership: a CBO-based PEARLS site strengthening their program by forming stronger connections with primary care clinic(s); and
  • Primary Care Clinic – Family Partnership: a primary care clinic that has implemented collaborative care and now seeks to enhance their model by including family members.

California non-profit 501(c)(3) primary care clinics and non-profit 501(c)(3) CBOs are eligible to apply. CBOs may include organizations offering Meals on Wheels programs, faith-based organizations, refugee service agencies, or adult health services, like Community-Based Adult Services (CBAS), among others.

Letters of Inquiry are due December 14, 2017, 5pm Pacific

Full proposals are due March 8, 2017

See more about Care Partners here.

Phase 1 Grant Continuation 

Background

Archstone Foundation is a private nonprofit grantmaking foundation whose mission is to prepare society in meeting the needs of an aging population. In 2014, the Foundation awarded a grant to the University of Washington (UW) and the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), to support an initiative to improve treatment of late-life depression in California known as Care Partners: Bridging Families, Clinics, and Communities to Advance Late-Life Depression Care. The Care Partners project sought to develop partnerships that work together to improve care for older adults with depression by strengthening the involvement of family, friends, and community-based organizations (CBO) in depression care. In 2015, seven sites in California were awarded two years of funding to implement an adaptation of Collaborative Care for late-life depression that involves family and/or CBO care partners in the care team. Since July 2015, these sites have encountered successes and challenges in implementing these Collaborative Care interventions. Some critical lessons learned over this period are highlighted in Attachment A, Seven Early Challenges of Care Partner Sites. It is the hope of the Foundation and the Care Partners team that these lessons learned will help guide the next steps for the collaborations to improve late-life depression care in California. At this time, Archstone Foundation is seeking to continue this important work by building on successful models and developing new innovations in the areas outlined below. 

Since July 2015, these sites have encountered successes and challenges in implementing these Collaborative Care interventions. Some critical lessons learned over this period are highlighted in Attachment A, Seven Early Challenges of Care Partner Sites. It is the hope of the Foundation and the Care Partners team that these lessons learned will help guide the next steps for the collaborations to improve late-life depression care in California. At this time, Archstone Foundation is seeking to continue this important work by building on successful models and developing new innovations in the areas outlined below.

Funding Opportunities

Current Archstone Foundation funded Care Partners: Bridging Families, Clinics, and Communities to Advance Late-Life Depression Care projects are invited to submit a full proposal for a three-year continuation grant in one of the following categories:

  1. Sustain the current model of shared care: up to $125,000 over three years. Sites may be funded up to a maximum of $50,000 per year for two years and a maximum of $25,000 for a third year for a total of $125,000 to sustain their current model
  2. Expand the current model to a new clinic location: up to $250,000 over three years. Applicants may choose to expand their current model to a new clinic location. For the expansion, sites may be funded up to a maximum of $100,000 per year for two years and a maximum of $50,000 for a third year for a total of $250,000 to expand their current model.
  3. Enhance the current model: up to $250,000 over three years. Applicants may enhance their current model by adding one of the following new components: 1) home visits, 2) family care partners, 3) peer support, and/or 4) resources to involve new linguistic populations. Sites may be funded up to a maximum of $100,000 per year for two years and a maximum of $50,000 for a third year for a total of $250,000 to enhance or add to their current model, regardless of the number of enhancements sites propose to add.

Phase 1, Cohort 1


The Project

Archstone Foundation, through its Depression in Late-Life Initiative, seeks to support innovative approaches to treating depression in older adults through community-engaged partnerships. The applicants proposed effective partnerships that build on, and learn from, the strengths each organization brings to the team, to better understand, reach, and treat late-life depression. Together, partners will implement evidence-based Collaborative Care for late-life depression. Innovations in care, funded through this Initiative, will explore Collaborative Care models that can be applied in other communities to improve late-life depression reach, engagement, and treatment across California, and across the country.

Partnerships

The following partnerships will work together to deliver Collaborative Care for depression:

Community-Based Organization (CBO) and Primary Care Clinic: This intervention will build on the strengths of the CBO and primary care clinic to determine an appropriate sharing of tasks involved in Collaborative Care for late-life depression. Tasks may be offered through the CBO, while others may be offered at the primary care clinic. The broad goal is to improve access and quality of care for older adults suffering from depression in the community.

Primary Care Clinic and Family: The Primary Care Clinic – Family intervention will feature innovative ways to systematically involve family members to strengthen the delivery of primary care-based depression treatment. These interventions will engage family members as partners, together with older adults suffering from depression, and primary care providers, to deliver Collaborative Care. The overall goal of this partnership is to promote a “family-centered” approach that will enhance access, and quality of care, for older adults suffering with depression, particularly those who are more difficult to engage in treatment.

CBO, Primary Care Clinic, and Family: This intervention will feature innovative ways to systematically involve primary care, CBOs and family members to strengthen the delivery of depression treatment.