Resource Library

Registry tools that support Collaborative Care vary widely in their sophistication, functionality, cost, and scalability.  

An article discussing integrated psychosocial care in oncology settings using the Collaborative Care model. The authors explain the components needed to achieve integration and the challenges that they pose, as well as strategies for future success. 

A textbook chapter describing the implementation of the Collaborative Care model in cancer settings. The chapter discusses the advantages of using the Collaborative Care model to deliver integrated psychosocial care in oncology settings and outlines steps for successful implementation. 

These guidelines will help care managers working in a care team approximate the size of their caseload based on the complexity of the clinic's population.

The Care Management Tracking System (CMTS) is a web-based registry that facilitates a shared care plan to collaboratively treat common medical and behavioral health conditions.

An outline of what a care manager should be prepared to discuss about a patient with a psychiatric consultant during a consultation.

The authors compared treatment of depression using measurement-based care to usual depression treatment. The study found that significantly more patients who received treatment with a measurement-based approach had higher response rates and acheived remission more quickly than those who received usual care. 

A retrospective cohort study determined the difference in remission time for depression patients being treated with usual care versus Collaborative Care.

In this randomized clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of Collaborative Care for adolescent depression in primary care, adolescents (aged 13-17 years old) were randomized to receive either 12 months of usual care or the Reaching Out to Adolescents in Distress (ROAD) intervention, an adapted collaborative care intervention. Results indicated that adolescents in the intervention group had greater improvements in depressive symptoms than the controls, suggesting that Collaborative Care can be effectively used in primary care to treat adolescent depression.

A systematic review of the evidence for routine screening for Major Depressive Disorder in children and adolescents.

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